Author’s Diary for February 13, 2020

(Don’t forget to tune in to the latest episode of the Radio Free Covenant podcast!)

We’ve got more battle tactics for your character to even the odds in xir next fight. Click through for more.

I’m tired, so I’m going to save the analysis for tomorrow. I added three tactical mechanics to Covenant today.

ELEVATION: If you’re higher than your target, it’s easier to hit it. If you’re lower, it’s harder. Easy and intuitive.

TERRAIN: There’s three kinds of terrain: clear, difficult, and rugged. Difficult and rugged are harder to move through, but easier to hide in.

THERMAL SHOCK: Suggested by Sazzy. Targets can be hot, normal, or cold temperature. Thermal and freezing weapons and effects can change a target’s temperature fast enough to impose disadvantages on its resistance bid against that weapon or effect’s damage.


Here’s what I wrote tonight:

ELEVATION

  • Relative elevation affects a character’s attack bids.
    • Character Is On Higher Elevation than Target: Add 1 advantage to attack bids.
    • Character Is On Lower Elevation than Target: Add 1 disadvantage to attack bids.

TERRAIN

  • Areas in a scene can have three kinds of terrain: clear, difficult, and rugged.
    • Clear:
      • Add 0 advantages to stealth and defense bids vs. ranged and area attacks.
      • Add 0 disadvantages to movement bids.
      • EXAMPLE: Paved or unpaved road, garden, lawn, flat or gently rolling ground, building or spaceship interior
    • Difficult:
      • Add 1 advantage to stealth and defense bids vs. ranged and area attacks.
      • Add 1 disadvantage to movement bids.
      • EXAMPLE: Hill, rocky terrain, forest, swamp, mud, barricade, barbed wire, ruined building, derelict spaceship
    • Rugged:
      • Add 2 advantages to stealth and defense bids vs. ranged and area attacks.
      • Add 2 disadvantages to movement bids.
      • EXAMPLE: Mountain, cliff, hedgerow, river or lake, volcanic terrain, rubble, wrecked or crashed starship

THERMAL SHOCK

  • Weapons and effects that change a target’s temperature drastically cause thermal shock, which potentially can increase damage done.
  • There are three kinds of temperature conditions: hot, normal, and cold.
    • Hot: The target is on fire or is in or has just come from a hot environment (EXAMPLE: a volcanic plain, a desert, or an oven).
    • Normal:
      • The target can be handled without insulated gloves or equipment by most sapients.
      • Unless otherwise noted, most characters and items are normal temperature.
    • Cold: The target has been refrigerated or is in or has just come from a cold environment (EXAMPLE: an arctic plain, an ice bath, or a freezer).
  • There are two kinds of weapons and effects that can change a target’s temperature: thermal and freezing weapons.
    • Thermal: Makes a target hot
    • Freezing: Makes a target cold.
  • When a target has its temperature changed by a weapon or effect, it suffers a number disadvantages to its resistance bid against that weapon or effect’s damage only.
    • EXAMPLE: A hot target hit by a freezing weapon has its temperature changed 2 steps (from hot to normal, then from normal to cold). It suffers 2 disadvantages to its resistance bid against the damage from that weapon hit due to thermal shock. This target is now cold and does not suffer further disadvantages to its resistance bids from that or any other freezing weapon or effect.
  • Targets with the brittle tag suffer 1 additional disadvantage to resistance bids from thermal shock.
  • Thermal shock does not have to be dramatic. Instead, it puts additional stress on the target’s structure and systems.
    • Freezing weapons won’t necessarily shatter targets.
    • Thermal weapons won’t necessarily melt, vaporize, or ignite targets.
  • Targets revert to their original temperature without further damage at the end of the scene.

That’s it for now. Stop by tomorrow.

Published by radiofreecovenant

A podcast about the science-fiction roleplaying game "Covenant" and the urban fantasy novel "Crossing the Line", soon to be published by Black Opal Books.

Join the Conversation

1 Comment

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: